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Design and Technology

Design Technology at Lydd Primary

"Design is a funny word. Some people think design means how it looks. But of course, if you look deeper, it's really how it works." Steve Jobs

“Technology makes possibilities. Design makes solutions. “John Maeda

Aims and Objectives

Design and technology helps to prepare children for the developing world. The subject encourages children to become creative problem solvers, both as individuals and as part of a team. Through the study of design and technology, they combine practical skills with an understanding of aesthetic, social and environmental issues. Design and Technology helps all children to become discriminating and informed consumers and potential innovators. It should assist children in developing a greater awareness and understanding of how everyday products are designed and made.

Curriculum Intent

At Lydd we follow the ‘Design, Make, Evaluate’ approach to the teaching of DT, as outlined in the National Curriculum Programmes of Study document. Where possible, this will be linked to TASC. The technical skills which we teach encompass the following areas: Construction, Mechanisms, Textiles and Food and Nutrition. We feel that the teaching of Food and Nutrition is a great importance and holds great relevance in current times. For this reason, children will study a Food and Nutrition unit every year. Additionally, a Mechanisms unit will be covered, along with either a Construction or Textiles unit. This ensures that the technical skills are covered with greater depth, and that – by the end of each key stage – children will have reached the expectations of the National Curriculum. If teachers wish to complete extra units to develop skills in an area that has not been assigned to their year group, they are encouraged to do so particularly during topic creative days that will take place to enrich the topic once a term. A whole school DT DAY will take place once an academic year inspired by a stand-alone whole school theme and link. Within this time one skill area will be explored and used to enrich and make links to our core subjects of English, mathematics and science. It is the intent of Lydd Primary School. Design Technology projects are often made cross curricular - linking to other subjects taught.

 

Key objectives of intent within the Design Technology:

· Products are to be made for a purpose.

· Individuality should be ensured in children’s design and construction of products.

· Delivery of the two strands: Designing and Making and Cooking and Nutrition.

· More emphasis to be given on creating ‘innovative’ products in KS2.

· Teaching the importance of making on-going changes and improvements during making stages.

· Looking into seasonality of ingredients and how they are grown, caught or reared.

· The introduction of computing and coding of products in KS2.

· Researching key events and individual designers in the History of Technology in KS2.

 

Curriculum Implementation

Design and technology is a crucial part of school life and learning and it is for this reason that as a school we are dedicated to the teaching and delivery of a high quality Design and Technology curriculum; through well planned and resourced projects and experiences.

Design and Technology also embeds our Learning Behaviours. It is an inspiring, rigorous and practical subject, requiring creativity, resourcefulness, and imagination. Pupils design and make products that solve real and relevant problems within a variety of contexts. It is very cross - curricular and draws upon subject knowledge and skills within Mathematics, Science, History, Computing and Art. Children learn to take risks, be reflective, innovative, enterprising and resilient. Through the evaluation of past and present technology they can reflect upon the impact of Design Technology on everyday life and the wider world.

During DT sessions, children are encouraged to be inquisitive about the way products work. We encourage both asking and answering questions in order to deepen children’s understanding of product and product design. They will use market research to inform their designs and, as they move up through the school, will be encouraged to draw detailed designs and make prototypes in order to refine their designs before creating their final piece. Whilst making their products, staff will guide them through the technical skills they will require, modelling good practice and highlighting safety considerations with the children. Through the evaluation stage of our ‘Plan, Make, Evaluate’ approach, children are encouraged to reflect upon their final products, considering how they could have altered their design or techniques to impact the overall appearance and usability of their product.

 

Early Years Foundation Stage

During the EYFS pupils explore and use a variety of media and materials through a combination of child initiated and adult directed activities. They have the opportunities to learn to:

· Use different media and materials to express their own ideas

· Use what they have learnt about media and materials in original ways, thinking about form, function and purpose

· Make plans and construct with a purpose in mind using a variety of resources

· Develop skills to use simple tools and techniques appropriately, effectively and safely

· Select appropriate resources for a product and adapt their work where necessary

· Cook and prepare food adhering to good health and hygiene routines

 

National Curriculum requirements at Key Stage 1

Through a variety of creative and practical activities, pupils should be taught the knowledge, understanding and skills needed to engage in an iterative process of designing and making. They should work in a range of relevant contexts, (for example the home and school, gardens and playgrounds, the local community, industry and the wider environment)

When designing and making, pupils should be taught to:

Design

· design purposeful, functional, appealing products for themselves and other users based on design criteria

· generate, develop, model and communicate their ideas through talking, drawing, templates, mock-ups and, where appropriate, information and communication technology

Make

· select from and use a range of tools and equipment to perform practical tasks, (or example, cutting, shaping, joining and finishing)

· select from and use a wide range of materials and components, including construction materials, textiles and ingredients, according to their characteristics

Evaluate

· explore and evaluate a range of existing products

· evaluate their ideas and products against design criteria

Technical knowledge

· build structures, exploring how they can be made stronger, stiffer and more stable

· explore and use mechanisms, (for example levers, sliders, wheels and axles), in their products.

 

National Curriculum requirements for food and Nutrition at KS1

As part of their work with food, pupils should be taught how to cook and apply the principles of nutrition and healthy eating. Instilling a love of cooking in pupils will also open a door to one of the great expressions of human creativity. Learning how to cook is a crucial life skill that enables pupils to feed themselves and others affordably and well, now and in later life.

Pupils should be taught to

• use the basic principles of a healthy and varied diet to prepare dishes

• understand where food comes from.

 

In Key Stage 2

Within key stage 2 key events and individuals that have influenced the world of Design Technology are teaching focuses that are to be covered.

The use of computer programmes and applications are also a key focus to be utilised by children in their design of their products.

National Curriculum requirements at Key Stage 2

Through a variety of creative and practical activities, pupils should be taught the knowledge, understanding and skills needed to engage in an iterative process of designing and making. They should work in a range of relevant contexts, for example, the home, school, leisure, culture, enterprise, industry and the wider environment.

When designing and making, pupils should be taught to:

Design

• use research and develop design criteria to inform the design of innovative, functional, appealing products that are fit for purpose, aimed at particular individuals or groups

• generate, develop, model and communicate their ideas through discussion, annotated sketches, cross-sectional and exploded diagrams, prototypes, pattern pieces and computer-aided design

Make

• select from and use a wider range of tools and equipment to perform practical tasks, such as cutting, shaping, joining and finishing, accurately

• select from and use a wider range of materials and components, including construction materials, textiles and ingredients, according to their functional properties and aesthetic qualities

 

Evaluate

• investigate and analyse a range of existing products

• evaluate their ideas and products against their own design criteria and consider the views of others to improve their work

• understand how key events and individuals in design and technology have helped shape the world

 

Technical knowledge

• apply their understanding of how to strengthen, stiffen and reinforce more complex structures

• understand and use mechanical systems in their products, (for example as gears, pulleys, cams, levers and linkages)

• understand and use electrical systems in their products, (for example series circuits incorporating switches, bulbs, buzzers and motors)

• to apply their understanding of computing to programme, monitor and control their products.

 

National Curriculum requirements for food and nutrition at KS2

As part of their work with food, pupils should be taught how to cook and apply the principles of nutrition and healthy eating. Instilling a love of cooking in pupils will also open a door to one of the great expressions of human creativity. Learning how to cook is a crucial life skill that enables pupils to feed themselves and others affordably and well, now and in later life.

 

Pupils should be taught to:

• understand and apply the principles of a healthy and varied diet

• prepare and cook a variety of predominantly savoury dishes using a range of cooking techniques

• to understand seasonality, and know where and how a variety of ingredients are grown, reared, caught and processed.

 

Curriculum impact

At Lydd Primary School we ensure our children will:

• develop the creative, technical and practical expertise needed to perform everyday tasks confidently and to participate successfully in an increasingly technological world

• build and apply a repertoire of knowledge, understanding and skills in order to design and make high-quality prototypes and products for a wide range of users and critique, evaluate and test their ideas and products and the work of others

• understand and apply the principles of nutrition and learn how to cook. Children will design and make a range of products. A good quality finish will be expected in all design and activities made appropriate to the age and ability of the child

Children learn how to take risks, becoming resourceful, innovative, enterprising and capable citizens. Through the evaluation of past and present design and technology, they develop a critical understanding of its impact on daily life and the wider world. High-quality design and technology education makes an essential contribution to the creativity, culture, wealth and well-being of the nation.

DT learning is recorded in Learning Links books and should typically evidence all three stages (Plan, Make and Evaluate). Due to the practical nature of design and technology, evidence of work undertaken by children can be in the form of teacher’s notes or as a photographic record.

Teachers assess children’s knowledge, understanding and skills in design and technology by making observations of the children working during lessons. As part of our target tracker assessment policy, children will receive both verbal and written feedback in order to aid progress in the subject. Children are also encouraged to be critical of their own work, highlighting their own next steps. . The school’s banding system is used to do this. The subject Leader then analyses this data and provides feedback in order to inform and improve future practice.

Inclusion

Lessons and activities are planned to include all children by using a range of approaches. This includes: questioning, use of equipment and mixed ability grouping to enable children to offer peer support. Lessons are planned to facilitate the best possible outcome for all children within the class.

Spiritual, moral, social and cultural development and British Values

Collaborative work in design and technology develops mutual respect for the differing opinions, beliefs and abilities of others. In addition, children develop a respect for the environment, for their own health and

safety and that of others. They learn to appreciate the value of similarities and differences and learn to show tolerance. A variety of experiences teaches them to appreciate that all people – and their views – are equally important. Children are encouraged to work in a democratic way, exercising the ‘give and take’ required for successful teamwork.